Life is tough enough keeping our own little brains from causing problems, but this week we learned that your brand can be damaged by someone else thinking it would be funny to make a crass political comment. Having people tweet for a large company is not uncommon. That person does, however, become the voice of the company. This week’s lesson is choose wisely, who your voice will be.

The Little Brain Tweet

“Obamas gma even knew it was going 2 b bad! ‘She died 3 days b4 he became president’. #nbcpolitics,” @KitchenAidUSA posted to 24,000 followers before quickly deleting the tweet.

Who is in Control of your Little Brain on Twitter?A person tweeting for KitchenAid, a well respected brand, spewed out a personal excuse-for-a-joke about President Obama’s Grandmother. The tweet was supposed to post from his personal account, but instead was sent from the brand’s account. And, like most tweets, thousands read it before the company could take it down.

On the television show Downton Abbey, Maggie Smith’s character Violet said it best in reply to a crude and distasteful remark on the show: “Vulgarity is no substitute for wit.”

The Apology

KitchenAid was embarrassed. They immediately apologized, then followed up with a more meaningful apology to President Obama and his family.

Taking Responsibility and the Apology are Big Brain moves. Fast and sincere, with no room to doubt.

As for the tweeter, not only was the joke unfunny, his using a deceased relative as the butt of a joke is as Little Brain as it gets.

KitchenAid responded quickly by saying that person will no longer tweet for them.

The Legacy

This one bad tweet will be with KitchenAid for quite some time. The fast use of the Apology Tool will lessen the impact and negative Legacy, but damage was done.

Little Brain tweets leave bad Legacies and do not go way quickly.

Who is tweeting for you?

Live Big – Think Big – Give Big

© 2012 Kevin T. McCarney. All rights reserved.

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The Apology Tool

(for more on this topic, see page 128 in the book)

Taking Responsibility

(for more on this topic, see page 126 in the book)

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